GBSport | Coach
169
archive,paged,category,category-coach,category-169,paged-2,category-paged-2,qode-listing-1.0.1,qode-social-login-1.0,qode-quick-links-1.0,qode-restaurant-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-13.0,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.4,vc_responsive

Coach

Bookkeeping, Coach, Expenses, Latest / 08.01.2017

questioniconWe get asked this question regularly by self-employed coaches and the answer is usually no.    Travel from home to your 'principal place of work' is not an allowable expense so this will mean that a coach principally working at one club or venue will not usually be able to claim travel to the club/venue as an allowable expense. A coach could argue that their business base is their home, i.e. their principal place of work, because their home office is where they carry out their business administration, produce lesson plans, telephone and email customers, etc.     This will almost certainly be challenged by HMRC if the hours spent in the 'home office' are insignificant or where the coach is unable to convince HMRC as to the work carried out.
Bookkeeping, Club, Coach, Latest / 03.01.2017

questioniconIt is not illegal for someone with no accounting qualifications to call themselves an accountant so it is important to ensure that you check how qualified your accountant is before they work on your bookkeeping/accounts. A recent survey revealed that less than 10% of organisations/individuals actually check the qualifications of their accountant, usually because they wrongly assume that you have to have qualifications to call yourself an accountant.
Bookkeeping, Club, Coach, Latest, Tax / 29.12.2016

warningiconWe come across a lot of clubs and coaches who assume that they won't have any problems with the tax authorities (HMRC) because the amounts of money involved are so small, and therefore HMRC just won't be interested. There is some truth in this - HMRC will not generally dedicate resources to investigate clubs or coaches if the amounts involved are insignificant but that does not mean they won't take action if they find out about any issues or discrepancies.
Coach, Latest, Self-Employment, Tax / 18.12.2016

warningiconHaving just returned from a visit to a sports coach who has just received a letter informing her that she has been chosen for a HMRC tax inspection, we thought it would be a good time to remind coaches to review their business record keeping before they get a call from HMRC and to outline the top five issues coaches have as a result of an investigation.
Club, Coach, Latest, Self-Employment, Tax / 14.12.2016

warningiconHMRC is actively checking the status of self-employed coaches and workers in sport to verify if they are really self-employed or are actually employees.    Clubs and coaches paying other coaches should therefore verify the status of their workers without delay in order to avoid a potentially hefty tax bill. It is a common misconception in sport that the person paying the worker (the client) can just declare the worker to be self-employed - whether they ACTUALLY are or not will depend on the way they actually work with the person and on the documentation in place.    It is common to get a situation on sport where the worker is a registered self-employed worker and there is a contract in place to state this, yet the worker is declared a employee by HMRC because of the actual way the client and worker work together.
Club, Coach, Latest, Legal / 10.12.2016

questioniconYou may legally require licences from THREE different regulatory bodies if playing DVDs publicly, i.e. to members, non-members or pupils.     A public performance of a DVD is any showing that is outside a 'domestic and private context'. The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 states you need to get permission from the copyright holder to ‘perform’ music in public – and a music licence grants you this permission.     Unfortunately, the rights of performers, directors and composers are regulated by three different organisations, hence you may need three different licences, depending on the film you are showing.
Club, Coach, Latest, Legal / 03.12.2016

warningiconDo you play recorded music in your clubhouse or coaching sessions using a radio, CD player, TV or MP3 player?   Can more than one person hear the music?  Then you are legally required to have at least one music licence - failure to do so could result in prosecution. Playing recorded (or live) music where more than one person can listen to the music legally requires two music licences, one from an organisation called the Performing Rights Society (PRS, representing songwriters and publishers) and one from an organisation called Phonographic Performance Limited (PPL, representing record companies and performers).
Club, Coach, Latest, Self-Employment / 03.12.2016

We regularly visit clubs who have decided to employ their coach/groundsman/cleaner because they were told that they cannot be engaged as a self-employed worker if they require the person to work the same hours week in week out. This is not correct - you can engage a self-employed worker to work for you for the same hours every week, provided that you have ensured that they are registered as self-employed and that you have ensured that you meet the HMRC self-employment guidelines, i.e. you are working with the person in a way that will satisfy one of three scenarios outlined in the guidelines.
Bookkeeping, Coach, Expenses / 25.11.2016

A Sky Sports subscription is very unlikely to be accepted by HMRC (tax authorities) as an allowable expense for a sports coach.    A business expense has to be wholly and exclusively for business purposes - HMRC state on their website that:

The general rule is that costs you pay with the sole purpose of earning business profits are allowable expenses

A tax inspector we work with in the Midlands told us that they regularly get individuals claiming that they need Sky Sports for 'research' purposes and to 'keep up to date'.    These reasons will be unacceptable to HMRC and they will check to see whether a coach has made a similar claim for expenses in the past.