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Club

Bookkeeping, Club, Coach, Latest, Tax / 22.01.2017

There are two potential financial outlays for a club or coach when they are selected for a tax inspection - the possibility of having to pay backdated tax/penalties and the cost of using an accountant to represent the club/coach throughout the investigation. The first can only be minimised by ensuring all tax affairs are in order.   The cost of the accountant can be minimised through tax inspection insurance and should not be underestimated - a recent investigation for a sports club in the north of England resulted in a bill from their accountants of over £4,000 for representing the club during the seven months the investigation lasted.      The club were offered tax inspection insurance by the accountancy firm but decided that the £165 cost they were quoted was money they could save.
Club, Coach, Latest, Marketing / 16.01.2017

thumbsupiconWe work with numerous clubs and coaches to help them develop an effective marketing plan and there are some basics that everyone should have in place to enable them to effectively monitor whether what they are doing works. The most important of these is calculating and monitoring your retention rate, a key measure of how good are you are keeping your members/customers.
Club, Latest / 11.01.2017

questioniconA not for profit sports club should ensure that has a constitution that clearly states that it is a not for profit organisation and should include a clause similar to the following to confirm that no profit/surplus is distributed to individual members:
The income and property of the Club shall be applied solely towards the promotion of the club and no portion thereof shall be paid or transferred directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly by way of distribution, bonus or otherwise by way of profit to the members of the Club or third parties other than other registered community amateur sports clubs or charities. No member shall be paid a salary, bonus fee or other remuneration for playing for the Club.
Club, Latest, Legal / 09.01.2017

warningiconA recent call from a panicked committee member to our helpline highlights the need for sports clubs to be vigilant in ensuring that they check that any worker at the club is entitled to work in the UK. The call resulted from the committee member finding out that their recently engaged coach does not actually have the right to work in the UK.     The club had not carried any checks before recruiting the coach and now face the prospect of  a maximum financial penalty of £20,000 (per illegal worker) should the authorities find out about the appointment.        The club is an unincorporated association with little money and therefore any fine imposed on the club will be the personal liability of one or more members of the committee if the club is unable to pay.
Club, Latest, Tax / 06.01.2017

warningiconThe recent case of Eynsham Cricket Club has again highlighted the need for clubs to get advice directly from HMRC when considering any form of building project. The club were wrongly informed by independent experts that their new pavilion would not be subject to VAT because they were registered as a Community Amateur Sports Club and were not for profit.    The club went ahead with the project but were then told last September by HMRC that the building project would be subject to a £34,000 VAT bill, money the club does not have and could now mean that the club is forced to close.
Bookkeeping, Club, Coach, Latest / 03.01.2017

questioniconIt is not illegal for someone with no accounting qualifications to call themselves an accountant so it is important to ensure that you check how qualified your accountant is before they work on your bookkeeping/accounts. A recent survey revealed that less than 10% of organisations/individuals actually check the qualifications of their accountant, usually because they wrongly assume that you have to have qualifications to call yourself an accountant.
Club, Latest, Volunteer / 02.01.2017

questioniconSomeone who decides to volunteer at their sports club should NOT have to take out insurance in case they have an accident or cause an accident to a third party whilst volunteering. We have seen a number of insurance brokers promoting such cover and there is no real evidence that we or Volunteering representative groups have seen that suggests this cover is needed.
Bookkeeping, Club, Coach, Latest, Tax / 29.12.2016

warningiconWe come across a lot of clubs and coaches who assume that they won't have any problems with the tax authorities (HMRC) because the amounts of money involved are so small, and therefore HMRC just won't be interested. There is some truth in this - HMRC will not generally dedicate resources to investigate clubs or coaches if the amounts involved are insignificant but that does not mean they won't take action if they find out about any issues or discrepancies.
Club, Coach, Latest, Self-Employment, Tax / 14.12.2016

warningiconHMRC is actively checking the status of self-employed coaches and workers in sport to verify if they are really self-employed or are actually employees.    Clubs and coaches paying other coaches should therefore verify the status of their workers without delay in order to avoid a potentially hefty tax bill. It is a common misconception in sport that the person paying the worker (the client) can just declare the worker to be self-employed - whether they ACTUALLY are or not will depend on the way they actually work with the person and on the documentation in place.    It is common to get a situation on sport where the worker is a registered self-employed worker and there is a contract in place to state this, yet the worker is declared a employee by HMRC because of the actual way the client and worker work together.
Club, Coach, Latest, Legal / 10.12.2016

questioniconYou may legally require licences from THREE different regulatory bodies if playing DVDs publicly, i.e. to members, non-members or pupils.     A public performance of a DVD is any showing that is outside a 'domestic and private context'. The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 states you need to get permission from the copyright holder to ‘perform’ music in public – and a music licence grants you this permission.     Unfortunately, the rights of performers, directors and composers are regulated by three different organisations, hence you may need three different licences, depending on the film you are showing.