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Latest, Web Design, Wordpress / 02.02.2017

A number of National Governing Bodies (NGB) now offer software to their affiliated clubs and coaches that enables them to create and maintain their own website.  An example of this is the ClubSpark system provided to affiliated tennis venues and coaches by the Lawn Tennis Association. If your club/business is using one of these services, the site address will usually have the name of the system included which may result in the website address not being particularly memorable.   For example, Shifnal Tennis Club's web address on the ClubSpark system is https://clubspark.lta.org.uk/ShifnalTennisClub - not exactly easy to remember! That's where a service called WEB FORWARDING comes in - you can create/use a memorable domain name of your choice and redirect any visitor using it to your NGB website address.   
Club, Employment, Latest, Legal, Volunteer / 29.01.2017

A number of clubs were penalised by the tax authorities last year for paying volunteers so called expenses because they were deemed to be a payment for services, i.e. the volunteer was in fact a worker. This will happen if you pay volunteers for more than their actual out-of-pocket expenses and it is something HMRC will scrutinise if they decide to inspect your club or coaching business.
Club, Latest, Legal, Volunteer / 25.01.2017

questioniconAn ‘unincorporated association’ is an organisation set up through an agreement between a group of people who come together for a reason other than to make a profit, e.g. a sports club.      The term is also used to describe the organisation as not being a 'corporate body', i.e. the organisation is not a limited company. The vast majority of sports club are unincorporated associations.      You don't need to register an unincorporated association with anyone and its rules and regulations are typically detailed in a constitution.
Club, Latest, Self-Employment / 24.01.2017

thumbsupiconThe word retainer is often used in sport to describe a fixed fee paid by a club to a self-employed coach/worker for certain services, with the fee usually being paid on an annual basis. This is not strictly speaking a retainer in the correct meaning of the word - an actual retainer is a fee paid to 'retain' the services of a worker, i.e. a payment to ensure that the worker is available to work for the club when required.    It would typically be paid to an experienced coach as an inducement to stay at the club.
Bookkeeping, Club, Coach, Latest, Tax / 22.01.2017

There are two potential financial outlays for a club or coach when they are selected for a tax inspection - the possibility of having to pay backdated tax/penalties and the cost of using an accountant to represent the club/coach throughout the investigation. The first can only be minimised by ensuring all tax affairs are in order.   The cost of the accountant can be minimised through tax inspection insurance and should not be underestimated - a recent investigation for a sports club in the north of England resulted in a bill from their accountants of over £4,000 for representing the club during the seven months the investigation lasted.      The club were offered tax inspection insurance by the accountancy firm but decided that the £165 cost they were quoted was money they could save.
Coach, Latest / 20.01.2017

questioniconThe advent of the smart phone has meant that it is really easy for coaches to offer video analysis to their pupils during lessons. The apps available are incredibly cheap and very easy to use and there is a wealth of help and instruction on the internet for anyone who struggles to get them to work.       Here we list out top three video analysis systems for coaches on a budget.

Club, Coach, Latest, Marketing / 16.01.2017

thumbsupiconWe work with numerous clubs and coaches to help them develop an effective marketing plan and there are some basics that everyone should have in place to enable them to effectively monitor whether what they are doing works. The most important of these is calculating and monitoring your retention rate, a key measure of how good are you are keeping your members/customers.
Club, Latest / 11.01.2017

questioniconA not for profit sports club should ensure that has a constitution that clearly states that it is a not for profit organisation and should include a clause similar to the following to confirm that no profit/surplus is distributed to individual members:
The income and property of the Club shall be applied solely towards the promotion of the club and no portion thereof shall be paid or transferred directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly by way of distribution, bonus or otherwise by way of profit to the members of the Club or third parties other than other registered community amateur sports clubs or charities. No member shall be paid a salary, bonus fee or other remuneration for playing for the Club.
Club, Latest, Legal / 09.01.2017

warningiconA recent call from a panicked committee member to our helpline highlights the need for sports clubs to be vigilant in ensuring that they check that any worker at the club is entitled to work in the UK. The call resulted from the committee member finding out that their recently engaged coach does not actually have the right to work in the UK.     The club had not carried any checks before recruiting the coach and now face the prospect of  a maximum financial penalty of £20,000 (per illegal worker) should the authorities find out about the appointment.        The club is an unincorporated association with little money and therefore any fine imposed on the club will be the personal liability of one or more members of the committee if the club is unable to pay.
Bookkeeping, Coach, Expenses, Latest / 08.01.2017

questioniconWe get asked this question regularly by self-employed coaches and the answer is usually no.    Travel from home to your 'principal place of work' is not an allowable expense so this will mean that a coach principally working at one club or venue will not usually be able to claim travel to the club/venue as an allowable expense. A coach could argue that their business base is their home, i.e. their principal place of work, because their home office is where they carry out their business administration, produce lesson plans, telephone and email customers, etc.     This will almost certainly be challenged by HMRC if the hours spent in the 'home office' are insignificant or where the coach is unable to convince HMRC as to the work carried out.